Python Architecture Patterns: Master API design, event-driven structures, and package management in Python - THE PIRATE BOOK

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Thursday, January 13, 2022

Python Architecture Patterns: Master API design, event-driven structures, and package management in Python

 

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Python Architecture Patterns: Master API design, event-driven structures, and package management in Python

  • Length: 594 pages
  • Edition: 1
  • Publisher: 
  • Publication Date: 2022-01-12

Make the best of your test suites by using cutting-edge software architecture patterns in Python

Key Features

  • Learn how to create scalable and maintainable applications
  • Build a web system for micro messaging using concepts in the book
  • Use profiling to find bottlenecks and improve the speed of the system

Book Description

Developing large-scale systems that continuously grow in scale and complexity requires a thorough understanding of how software projects should be implemented. Software developers, architects, and technical management teams rely on high-level software design patterns such as microservices architecture, event-driven architecture, and the strategic patterns prescribed by domain-driven design (DDD) to make their work easier.

This book covers these proven architecture design patterns with a forward-looking approach to help Python developers manage application complexity―and get the most value out of their test suites.

Starting with the initial stages of design, you will learn about the main blocks and mental flow to use at the start of a project. The book covers various architectural patterns like microservices, web services, and event-driven structures and how to choose the one best suited to your project. Establishing a foundation of required concepts, you will progress into development, debugging, and testing to produce high-quality code that is ready for deployment. You will learn about ongoing operations on how to continue the task after the system is deployed to end users, as the software development lifecycle is never finished.


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